Tuesday, September 20, 2016

SunLESS Printing

So one day I woke up wanting to sun print and this is what I saw outside . . .


. . . another day I've been busy with the family or work and missed the sun. . .


What is an artist to do?!? 
Improvise!

By creating a fake Sun or a Heated situation, I have found I can still produce great "Sun Prints."

1) Fake Sun

Following the instructions in this post, prepare the fabric and place the painted and masked fabric under a Fake Sun.  I like using shop lights. . .

. . . as well as my desk lamps.

Both create the same images I get outside in the bright sun.


The amount of time to create the Sunless print will depend upon the heat and humidity in your home or studio.

2)  Bottom Heat

By placing a heating pad underneath the painted fabric laid out on a cookie sheet, the same evaporation effect occurs and allows you to have a Sunless print!

3) Ironing

The fastest way to create a Sunless print is to use a very hot iron.  
I demonstrated this method on Quilting Arts TV Season 1700 and 1800.  

  • Simply place your painted fabric and heat-proof masks (I like to use shapes cut from overhead transparencies) on to a cookie sheet.  (Don't plan on using the cookie sheet for baking again!)
  • Cover the fabric with a Mistyfuse Goddess sheet.
  • With an iron set on the cotton setting, iron over the top of the fabric until dry.  This will take about 5 to 7 minutes of ironing.
  • Remove the Goddess sheet and masks to discover your fabulous designs!

Are you inspired to create some fabulous Sun Printed Fabrics of your own yet?  Go forth and create and then come back here on September 23rd to learn one more Sun Printed trick!

Leave a comment below to be entered for another chance at winning these four lovely Sun Printed Fat Quarters, Two yards of Mistyfuse and a Mini Goddess Sheet!


33 comments:

  1. Can't wait to try ALL the sunless sun printing methods! So useful in the Winter Wonderland state!

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  2. Great ideas! Who knew? I have got to try that soon!

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  3. Great idea especially for those of us in the Pacific Northwest. Thanks for the post and giveaway.

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  4. What a great idea....instant new fabric whenever u want it...
    Thanks for this great sunless idea

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  5. Thanks for telling us about the sunless methods. For the lamps, does it matter what kind you use? I mostly have LED and fluorescent and these do not produce much heat.

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    1. Laura - I live in a very dry state and so the heat from the lamp does not matter as much as just having dry air for the evaporation to take place. Let me know if it works for you!

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  6. I've done some "sunless" printing, but not tried with an iron... Need to give that a try :)

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  7. Thank you - I never realised you could sunprint without sun!!

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  8. This is terrific information, thank you! I have always wanted to try sun printing, and now that I know I can do it indoors, and without sun, I'm in!! The sun is not always predictable or present, when the opportunity arises.

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  9. This sounds like a great solution for those bad weather days! I'm waiting for my special dyes to arrive so I can experiment with both sun and sunless printing. Thanks!

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  10. I cannot wait to try the sun-less technique. Who wants to wait for the weather to be just right!

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  11. Thanks for the information....I'm going to try indoor sunprinting on a cold winter day.

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  12. Thank you for sharing this technique.

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  13. How creative!! Such innovative solutions!!

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  14. Send that rain this way - everything here is dry as a bone!! Looking forward to trying this out! Thanks for sharing!!!

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  15. Would never have thought to use heat beneath the fabric too!
    Thank you so much for the advice here : )

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  16. I loved reading about this. Just yesterday I hosted my art group at my studio. I had lined up several different sun printing techniques. Who would have predicted that Our Mr Sun would go into hiding. In Southern California! We still had pretty good results with some of the techniques. But I'd never tried the heating pad method. I'll keep that in mind for next time. Thanks, Lisa!

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  17. I really enjoy your blog. Very informative and inspiring.

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  18. Wow - that's easier than I thought! Thanks for the great information. I'm going to try this!

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  19. How creative. I love it. Misty Fuse is the best.

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  20. Interesting idea to use bottom heat! Great info . . . thanks!

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  21. Your fabric is lovely. Can't wait to try this!

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  22. Just love what you are doing Lisa! Can't wait to see you in Houston.

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  23. Thanks for the great information! I'm so excited to try these methods out. Really enjoy your fun blog. Thanks for enabling me to beat the "unsunny" days. Pam Gonzalez

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  24. Wow the info is great! I am reading my post backwards catching up on my blog reading and realize I read the last post first...
    Winter sun printing her I come!

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  25. Wow the info is great! I am reading my post backwards catching up on my blog reading and realize I read the last post first...
    Winter sun printing her I come!

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  26. Thank you for this information. I wondered if it was possible to create sunless prints. Obviously don't play enough.

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  27. BTW, this is a great blog. Keep up the good work!

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  28. sunless sun printing...what a great way to beat the winter blues!!

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  29. I had no idea that overhead transparencies could take the heat. What a great tip.

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