Sunday, January 24, 2016

Kitchen Resists with Julie B. Booth: Freezer Paper Masks and Blue Glue Gel Resist

Get some lovely color effects with freezer paper masks and glue gel resist.

Welcome to my final Kitchen Resists tutorial.  In this one we really "layer it on" using freezer paper masks and a resist made from blue school glue gel. If you can't find the blue glue gel- clear glue gel or white glue will also work. The fabrics I made in this project have many paint layers, but you can choose to apply fewer layers and still get some great results.

Don't forget to leave a comment at the end of this post or my posts from January 3 or January 10 in order to be eligible for my giveaway of a copy of my book, Fabric Printing at Home: Quick and Easy Fabric Design Using Fresh Produce and Found Objects, plus one yard of Prepared for Dyeing cotton. I'll be choosing a winner on January 31.

Layer it On! Freezer Paper Masks and Blue Glue Gel Resist
You will need the following materials for this project:

To create the mask designs:
  • Prepared for Dyeing cotton fabric (or pre-washed 100% cotton fabric). I used 12" x 15" pieces.
  • Freezer paper (I use Reynold's).
  • Craft knife with #11 blades.
  • Self-healing cutting mat.
  • Optional: Small sharp scissors.
  • #2 pencil (optional).
  • Iron and ironing board.
  • Optional: Pressing cloth.

To create resist designs:

A Detailer Writer is a small squeeze bottle with a precision tip. Use it if you want finer lines.

To paint over the designs:
  • A flat work surface covered with plastic. I like to make 15" x 20" Portable Work Surfaces with foam board covered with plastic film. Go here to learn how to make them. 
  • A 15" x 20" piece of cotton or muslin for each Portable Work Surface. This fabric will act as a blotter when painting over the resist-covered fabric.
  • Masking tape.
  • Transparent fabric paints (I like to use Pebeo Setacolor Transparent fabric paints). Use colors straight out of the bottle or mix custom colors starting with the lightest color and gradually adding darker colors. Dilute to the consistency of light cream to help prevent breaching of (breaking through) the resist (If you use Setacolor, it will be about a 1:1.5 ratio paint to water).
  • Opaque fabric paints (I like to use Pebeo Setacolor Opaque fabric paints). Use colors straight out of the bottle or mix custom colors. Do not dilute.
  • Plastic containers and spoons for mixing paints.
  • Foam brushes to apply transparent paints.
  • Foam daubers to apply opaque paints. Go here to learn how to make them.
  • Dense foam brayers (I use Testrite) to apply opaque paints.
  • Glass or Plexiglas palettes to roll out opaque paints.
  • Wipe-up cloth.

To set and remove the resist:
  • Iron and ironing board.
  • (2) Pressing cloths.
  • Plastic tub that fits in your kitchen sink.
  • Liquid dishwashing soap.
 
Torn Freezer Paper Masks
To create the fabrics in this project start by tearing strips of freezer paper. Iron the strips onto the fabric with the plastic-coated side facing the fabric. Strips can be ironed on horizontally, vertically or to create a grid pattern. (Optional: Use a pressing cloth over the strips to protect the iron)




First Layer: Painting Over the Strips
Paint the uncovered fabric between the freezer paper strips with alternating colors to create beautiful backgrounds with interesting color mixing.

1. Mix up two colors of transparent fabric using either the normal dilution (1 part paint to 2 parts water) or the slightly thicker dilution (1 part paint to 1.5 parts water).
2. Use foam brushes to apply the paint. Alternate the two colors and paint the fabric between strips. Paint up to and along the edge of the torn freezer paper. 


 

3. Let the paint dry completely before removing the freezer paper.

       
Notice the beautiful color mixing created by this technique.


Second Layer: Drawing Blue Glue Gel Designs
Draw designs with blue school glue gel. When dry the glue acts as a resist when adding more paint layers.

1. Use blue school glue gel directly from the bottle or squeeze some into a plastic Detailer Writer. Draw designs on the painted fabric.


2. Let the glue dry completely.


Additional Layers of Paint
After the blue glue gel dries use some of the following techniques to add paint layers over the resist.

1. Tear additional freezer paper strips and iron them onto the fabric covering different parts of the fabric from the first round (I suggest using a pressing cloth to protect your iron).


Tear additional freezer paper strips and iron them over the dried glue designs.

2. Or use a craft knife and self-healing cutting mat to cut out designs from a sheet of freezer paper, then iron it to your glue-covered fabric.
3. Mix up additional colors of either transparent fabric paint (1:1.5 ratio paint to water) or opaque paint.
4. Tape a piece of cotton or muslin to your Portable Work Surface and then tape your fabric with torn or cut freezer paper designs on top. The fabric underneath will act as a blotter, absorbing the excess transparent fabric paint, and preventing breaching of (breaking through) the resist.


Tape a piece of muslin or cotton underneath the glue-covered fabric to prevent additional layers of wet paint from seeping under the resist.

5. Use foam brushes to apply transparent fabric paint to the uncovered areas. Paint up to the edges of the torn freezer paper masks as you did with the first layer of paint. Optional: Use a wipe-up cloth to pick up excess paint.



6. To apply opaque fabric paint over torn strips or craft knife-cut designs, use foam daubers to daub paint over the exposed fabric areas and along the edges of the freezer paper masks.



7. For a soft pastel texture roll over the freezer paper masks with a paint-covered dense foam brayer. Spoon 1/4 teaspoon of opaque paint onto the glass palette. Roll out the paint until the brayer is evenly coated. Then roll over the freezer paper masks.



8. You can use one, two or all three of these paint application techniques for different effects. See the finished fabrics below and read the captions to see the sequence of paint layers.


Setting the Paint and Removing the Resist
1. See the instructions from my first blog post for setting the fabric paint.
2. To remove the blue glue gel resist: Place the resist-covered fabric(s) in the plastic tub. Add warm water and some liquid dishwashing soap. Let the fabric(s) soak for at least 10 minutes to soften the glue. Rub to remove the resist or use a soft toothbrush. You will need to occasionally dump and refill the tub with warm soapy water until all the resist is removed.

3.  I like to put the fabric through a delicate machine wash (warm or cold water with some detergent), just to be sure that all the resist is removed.
4. Machine or air dry.


Below is a selection of fabrics created with these techniques.

1. Red and blue transparent fabric paint applied over torn freezer paper strips. 2. Blue school glue gel designs drawn on fabric with Detailer Writer. 3. Second layer of torn freezer paper strips ironed to fabric exposing different areas. 4. Red and blue transparent fabric paint applied in opposite sequence to first application.



1. Yellow-green and blue transparent fabric paint applied over torn freezer paper strips. 2. Blue school glue gel designs drawn on fabric with a Detailer Writer. 3.Second layer of torn freezer paper strips ironed to fabric to expose different areas. 4. Rust brown and red transparent fabric paint applied to exposed areas. 5. Removed freezer paper strips and ironed on a new layer of torn freezer paper strips to expose different areas to paint. 6. Blue, light green and turquoise opaque fabric applied to exposed areas with a foam dauber.



1. Light blue and blue-violet transparent fabric paint applied over torn freezer paper strips (strips ironed onto fabric to form a grid design).2. Blue school glue gel designs drawn on fabric with Detailer Writer. 3. Designs cut out of a sheet of freezer paper using a craft knife. 4. Freezer paper with cut designs ironed to fabric. 5. Turquoise paint applied to open areas of freezer paper mask using a foam dauber. 6. Black paint applied over open areas of freezer paper mask using a dense foam brayer. 7. Freezer paper mask removed and fabric painted with violet transparent fabric paint.

Thank you for joining me for this first month of The Printed Fabric Bee's "reboot". I hope you've enjoyed learning about a variety of Kitchen Resists and will give them a try. For more projects like these sign up for my free online newsletter, Julie B Booth Surface Design News by going to my blog (sign up is in the right-hand column) OR pick up a copy of Fabric Printing at Home!

Remember to leave a comment for a chance to win. I'll be back to announce the giveaway winner on January 31. Good luck!
  


68 comments:

  1. I'm going to do these techniques with my granddaughter this week, thanks for the ideas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Laura- That sounds great! Hope that you'll post some results and let me know.

      Delete
  2. Once it warms up a bit in my sun room, I'll get busy playing with my paints.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds good to me! Wish it would warm up here...we have 2 1/2 feet of snow to shovel!

      Delete
  3. Incredible. Now how many of tgese techniques are transferable to paper? Obviously not the glue, but a glue stencil would wirk. I live the depth of layers without muddying the colors. Thank you so much for these tutorials.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope that you'll try some of these on paper, Deborah! I adore freezer paper and it would work great ironed to paper. You can do the "wet" technique I show here or use it as a stencil and stencil paint through cut openings.

      Delete
  4. such kewl ideas, must try them soooooon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please do Mel...and then post some pics!

      Delete
  5. Great idea for homemade fat quarters? Lots of quilting possibilities for a wall quilt! Love it!Karen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! Hope you'll give a try and report back!

      Delete
  6. Always love a layered look! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome...I'm a big fan of layers...as you can probably guess!

      Delete
  7. Always love a layered look! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  8. LOVE all these different methods, the look is fantastic! If I were not so very tired today, just got home from a 3 day quilting seminar, I'd jump right into this! Will give it a go on my next day off as I have all the items you've used. Thank you so very much for the thorough instructions and photos. Best, Ani in NC

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ani...hope you weren't too affected by the storm. We had almost 30" here in Northern Virginia! When you get to trying this...post some results and let me know.

      Delete
    2. No snow at all here on the southern coastal plain. I'm in Wilmington, got a bit of rain and wind and the temps got down to 34 at the lowest. Just a few more degrees lower and we would have had some snow! I would *love* a few snow days off from my job though - need to finish a few projects to start on the new! :D I'll be sure to post photos, this type of process is the kind I love to do.

      Delete
  9. ThESE ARE beautiful. Never saw this technique. the photos helped!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Claudia- Thank you! It's very easy to do and you don't have to do all the layers to get some nice fabrics.

      Delete
  10. I have not seen this gel glue! I will have to look for it. I was just doing some fabric printing and stamping earlier this week, and wondering about resists. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Helena- you can probably find it at your craft store. There are a number of brands...but all are that turquoise-blue color. You can get the same effects using white glue if you can find the blue glue gel. If you haven't checked out the earlier post yet...do...they are also about resists.

      Delete
  11. Thank you for an excellent tutorial!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Carol. Hope you try it!

      Delete
  12. So glad I found your site! Lots of great ideas and techniques. I'm going to try this one tomorrow. Your book is definitely on my wish list!! Thanks for taking the time to share your talents!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Merrie Jo- Good luck with the drawing next week. I love teaching!

      Delete
  13. Thank you so much for sharing such fantastic details.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I just love this concept. I've been playing with freezer paper stencils but not to this degree and it's really inspiring! Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Molly. Hope you try it! I'm always trying to come up with new ways to use simple materials.

      Delete
  15. I just love this concept. I've been playing with freezer paper stencils but not to this degree and it's really inspiring! Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  16. What great techniques and such clear directions! Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcom JB! Enjoy trying them out!

      Delete
  17. I can't wait to try these! Great explanations. Thank you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Candy. Hope you have some fun with these techniques!

      Delete
  18. Great ideas - and they look quite manageable! I especially like the lines you can create with the glue resist. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I always try to work with things I either have at home already...or that I can get easily. The glue resist is tried and true! Hope you try this technique or one of the other two I've posted.

      Delete
  19. This process is great. The instructions are so clear too. Thank you. When they are this clear I think I might be able to do it. And if I screw up I think it will still turn out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Karen- I appreciate your comment about the clear instructions. I really try hard at that. This is really very straight -forward and you will always get a very unique result!

      Delete
  20. Thank you for sharing these techniques. I have tried the glue--same glue as in this tutorial--and had difficulty removing it. I wish I knew why because I'd like to try it again. The results are very interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gail- YOu really need to soak the glue-covered fabric in warm (and even hot) soapy water. Let it sit for at least 10 minutes so that it softens. I did recently see a video where the artist used an old key card or old credit card to scrape it off after it was softened. I usually rub the fabric together and continue to change soapy water and sometimes let it soak further.

      Delete
  21. Looks like 2016 is going to be a lot of fun with the Printed Fabric Bee! Thanks for the wonderfully detailed tutorials, Julie. Great ideas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Debbie. I can't wait either! I know that I'll be learning about a lot of new things from the other Bee members!

      Delete
  22. I am looking forward to lots of inspiration on the blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sandy- I think we're all in store for some wonderful tutorials this year!

      Delete
  23. Oh my Oh my!
    What a wonderful tutorial, thank you so much, you've really fired my enthusiasm.
    I must must must try these ideas! : )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have fun with them...and post some pics!

      Delete
  24. I loved the color combinations and the resist shapes that your created. I can't wait to try this

    ReplyDelete
  25. I loved the color combinations and the resist shapes that your created. I can't wait to try this

    ReplyDelete
  26. I love this!!
    I haven't come across blue glue gel here in th UK - would cheap PVA glue work ??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Gill- "yes" you can use white glue (but not Tacky glue which is too heavy and changes the "hand" of the fabric). Clear glue gel works fine too.

      Delete
  27. The visual impact of the layering is wonderful. Love that the fabric paint is so easy to use. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fabric paint is wonderful...so much easier than dye. Have fun Laura!

      Delete
  28. Wonderful instructions and examples. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  29. That last kitchen resist method was up my alley and down my street. I can hardly wait to try it.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Thanks for all the great tips! I love playing with fabric paint, and I hope I win!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good luck Michele! Glad you enjoyed the tutorial!

      Delete
  31. I have so many thoughts going through my head about designs to use....Just have to keep hold of them till I have time to play.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Get them down in your notebook! Have fun when you get the chance!

      Delete
  32. Always learning new things here!

    ReplyDelete
  33. Amazing masking techniques and super clean and luscious colors. I can imagine a gorgeous quilt!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Thanks for posting your reminder on FB! It led me to your post which then led me to your post about portable work surfaces from 2012. Yay! One side of my brain was like "That's brilliant!"and the other side of my brain was like "Duh! Why didn't you think of that?" Because sometimes when we're working in a small space on a table, our thinking can get kind of small too. Thank you for the idea!

    ReplyDelete
  35. I would love to add this technique to the things I already do!

    ReplyDelete
  36. This looks like so much fun. I've yet to use paint instead of my trusty MX dye, but you've inspired me to give it a whirl. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Beautiful results and the processes look so doable!! Thanks!!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for coming by and leaving us a message! We love hearing from you!